5 speakers 15 minutes each

Thu 15th Nov 2018

Frontiers of Health

The Tabernacle

7:00pm

SoldOut

Suzanne O’Sullivan

Suzanne O’Sullivan

Dr Suzanne O’Sullivan has been a consultant in neurology since 2004, first working at The Royal London Hospital and now as a consultant in clinical neurophysiology and neurology at The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, and for a specialist unit based at the Epilepsy Society. She specialises in the investigation of complex epilepsy and also has an active interest in psychogenic disorders.

Suzanne’s book about psychosomatic illness, It's All in Your Head, won both the Wellcome Book Prize and the Royal Society of Biology Book Prize.

‘Remarkable… It should be on the reading list of every medical student’ - P.D. Smith, Guardian on Brainstorm

Chris van Tulleken

Chris van Tulleken

Dr. Chris van Tulleken is an infectious diseases doctor at UCLH, and one of the BBC’s leading science presenters having worked on many flagship Health & Science programs. In 2017, Chris’ concerns about antibiotic resistance and over-reliance on prescription drugs led him to create a campaigning series for BBC One; ‘The Dr Who Gave up Drugs’, which generated a huge volume of letters and emails, having struck a chord with the nation. In 2018, he turned the focus of the topic to children with the second series, which received rave reviews. Another highlight of 2017, was Chris’ BBC1 film The Truth About...HIV - a programme supported by HRH Prince Harry, and Sir Elton John. Operation Ouch, Chris and twin brother Xand’s double BAFTA & Broadcast award winning series for CBBC, continues to delight audiences around the world, with Series 7 being filmed in 2018. Throughout the series the twins create fun and often disgusting experiments to help kids learn how the human body works. The programme results in fan mail from around the world from a young audience who want to know, above all, what they need to do to become doctors. Their second Operation Ouch tour of Australia this January was a huge hit and they hope to bring the fun to their British fans with a tour in 2018.
Chris and Xand’s programmes are often shaped by their readiness and ability to self-experiment and test out theories on one another (as clones, they are the ideal test and control) – whether changing their diets, exposing themselves to environmental extremes of heat, cold, sleeplessness, pain (sticking spikes through their faces and sticking cameras down their noses), Chris learns and informs his audience by becoming a patient himself. Last year saw Chris and Xand publish two new books - Operation Ouch! The HuMaual - a book all about human biology for children; and Secrets of the Human Body which accompanied aground-breaking BBC2 Science series. Chris and Xand grew up in London and both trained in medicine at Oxford University. Chris specialized in infectious disease and tropical medicine. He has worked as a doctor in some of the harshest and strangest environments on earth and trained the Army in survival. Chris’s expedition series Operation Iceberg for BBC Two saw a group of scientists adventure into the arctic exploring the formation and life of icebergs, whilst Chris and Xand’s debut series on Channel 4 Medicine Men Go Wild, (2008) saw them travel to remote locations such as Congo and South Georgia, in a hugely adventurous journey that sought to explore the limitations of Western Medicine. In 2016 Chris won the Max Perutz award at the Royal Institution for his HIV research.

Tim Spector

Tim Spector

Tim Spector is a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology, Director of the TwinsUK Registry and Head of the Department of Twin Research at Kings College London. His twin Registry of 13,000 twins, is the richest collection of genotypic and phenotypic information worldwide. His current work focuses on personalised medicine and the microbiome and directs the crowdfunded British Gut microbiome project. He has published over 900 research articles and is ranked as being in the top 1% of the world’s most cited scientists by Thomson-Reuters. He has been elected Fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences and is a prolific writer having published three popular science books. His latest book The Diet Myth was published in over ten languages. He is a regular blogger, and features regularly in the media www.tim-spector.co.uk
@timspector

Victoria Derbyshire

Victoria Derbyshire

Victoria Derbyshire is an award-winning journalist and broadcaster. She joined BBC Radio 5 Live in 1998 and spent 16 happy years presenting both the breakfast programme and later her own morning programme, winning 5 Sony Gold Awards. In 2015 she went on to host a daily news and current affairs show that airs on BBC 2 and BBC News. The same year, Victoria was diagnosed with breast cancer. Faced with this diagnosis, she made the decision to share her experiences in a series of video diaries in an effort to help demystify cancer treatment. To date, these videos have amassed over 13 million views. Victoria has also set up a Facebook page where she and her readers can share their experiences: https://www.facebook.com/DearCancerLoveVictoria. In 2017, Victoria was awarded a BAFTA and the programme also won the Mind Media Award for News & Current Affairs in 2017. Victoria is an ambassador for the teen cancer support charity, You Can.

About Dear Cancer
Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in Dear Cancer she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum.
By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone.

Christie Watson

Christie Watson

Christie Watson was a nurse for twenty years. She worked in a variety of healthcare settings, but spent most of her career in paediatric intensive care in large NHS hospitals before becoming a resuscitation nurse. Christie now teaches and writes and advocates for nursing. Her first novel, Tiny Sunbirds Far Away, won the Costa First Novel Award and her second novel, Where Women Are Kings, was also published to international critical acclaim. Her works have been translated into eighteen languages.

About The Language of Kindness
Taking us from birth to death and from A&E to the mortuary, The Language of Kindness is an astonishing account of a profession defined by acts of care, compassion and kindness. In the year in which we celebrate the 70 th anniversary of the NHS, The Language of Kindness is set to be one of 2018’s most urgent, most talked about and best-loved books.