5 speakers 15 minutes each

Sun 23rd Apr 2017

5x15: Wellcome Book Prize Brunch

The Tabernacle

11am

Jeevan Kalanithi

Jeevan Kalanithi

Jeevan Kalanithi is a technologist, entrepreneur and brother of Paul Kalanithi, whose posthumous memoir When Breath Becomes Air is shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017. Paul Kalanithi was a neurosurgeon and writer. He held degrees in English literature, human biology, and the history and philosophy of science and medicine from Stanford and Cambridge universities, before graduating from Yale School of Medicine. He also received the American Academy of Neurological Surgery’s highest award for research. His reflections on doctoring and illness have been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Paris Review Daily. Paul died in March 2015, aged 37 and is survived by his wife, Lucy and their daughter, Elizabeth Acadia. When Breath Becomes Air is a life-affirming reflection on facing our mortality and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a writer who became both. It has been shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017

Maylis de Kerangal

Maylis de Kerangal

Maylis de Kerangal spent her childhood in Le Havre, France. Her novel Birth of a Bridge was the winner of the Prix Franz Hessel and Prix Médicis in 2010. Her novella Tangente vers l’est was the winner of the 2012 Prix Landerneau. Her fifth novel, Mend the Living, is a 24-hour whirlwind of death and life, from fatal crash to life-saving operation. It was published in French to wide acclaim, winning the Grand Prix RTL-Lire award and being declared the Student Choice Novel of the Year by France Culture and Télérama. In 2016, it was longlisted for the Man Booker International. It has been shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017.

Siddhartha Mukherjee

Siddhartha Mukherjee

Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer physician and researcher, a stem cell biologist, and a cancer geneticist. He is the author of The Laws of Medicine and The Emperor of All Maladies: A biography of cancer, which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction and the Guardian First Book Award. Mukherjee is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University. A Rhodes Scholar, he graduated from Stanford University, the University of Oxford and Harvard Medical School. His laboratory has identified genes that regulate stem cells, and his team is internationally recognised for its discovery of skeletal stem cells and genetic alterations in blood cancers. He is the author of The Gene: An intimate history which tells the epic story of the discovery of the gene, interwoven with the story of Mukherjee’s own family and its recurring pattern of mental illness. It is shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017.

Sarah Moss

Sarah Moss

Sarah Moss was educated at the University of Oxford and is currently professor of creative writing at the University of Warwick. She is the author of four other novels – Cold Earth, Night Waking, which was selected for the Fiction Uncovered Prize in 2011, Bodies of Light and Signs for Lost Children – and is the coauthor of Chocolate: A global history. She spent 2009–10 as a visiting lecturer at the University of Iceland, and wrote an account of her time there, Names for the Sea: Strangers in Iceland, which was shortlisted for the RSL Ondaatje Prize 2013. Her most recent book, The Tidal Zone is shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017.